25% off (free shipping) Mugen Dachi Omote True Tatami Mat for Tameshig

25% off (free shipping) Mugen Dachi Omote True Tatami Mat for Tameshigiri Sword Cutting Test Target laborday sale

Regular price $30.00 Sale

Mugen Dachi Omote has quickly become the standard tatami for serious sword practitioners across the world. The tatami has been woven from the stems of soft rush (juncus effusus) to avoid the scratches that can occur due to courser tatami. The Mugen Dachi mats cut the same every time due to the consistent quality of the tatami. The mats are very clean to handle and absorb water very quickly.\n\nTatami Mat Measurements: 34 " x 70 "\n\nKyūdō is the Japanese martial art of archery. Experts in kyūdō are referred to as kyūdōka (弓道家). Kyūdō is based on kyūjutsu ("art of archery"), which originated with the samurai class of feudal Japan. Kyūdō is practised by thousands of people worldwide. As of 2005, the International Kyudo Federation had 132,760 graded members.\nThe tsuba (鍔, or 鐔) is usually a round (or occasionally squareish) guard at the end of the grip of bladed Japanese weapons, like the katana and its various variations, tachi, wakizashi, tantō, naginata etc. They contribute to the balance of the weapon and to the protection of the hand. The tsuba was mostly meant to be used to prevent the hand from sliding onto the blade during thrusts as opposed to protecting from an opponent's blade. The chudan no kamae guard is determined by the tsuba and the curvature of the blade. The diameter of the average katana tsuba is 7.5–8 centimetres (3.0–3.1 in), wakizashi tsuba is 6.2–6.6 cm (2.4–2.6 in), and tantō tsuba is 4.5–6 cm (1.8–2.4 in). \nDuring the Muromachi period (1333–1573) and the Momoyama period (1573–1603) Tsuba were more for functionality than for decoration, being made of stronger metals and designs. During the Edo period (1603–1868) there was peace in Japan so tsuba became more ornamental and made of less practical metals such as gold. \nTsuba are usually finely decorated, and nowadays are collectors' items. Tsuba were made by whole dynasties of craftsmen whose only craft was making tsuba. They were usually lavishly decorated. In addition to being collectors items, they were often used as heirlooms, passed from one generation to the next. Japanese families with samurai roots sometimes have their family crest (mon) crafted onto a tsuba. Tsuba can be found in a variety of metals and alloys, including iron, steel, brass, copper and shakudō. In a duel, two participants may lock their katana together at the point of the tsuba and push, trying to gain a better position from which to strike the other down. This is known as tsubazeriai (鍔迫り合い), lit. pushing tsuba against each other. Tsubazeriai is a common sight in modern kendo. \nIn modern Japanese, tsubazeriai (鍔迫り合い) has also come to mean "to be in fierce competition." Also used for tensa zangetsu.\nIaitō (居合刀) is a modern metal practice sword, without a cutting edge, used primarily for practicing iaido.\nMost iaitō are made of an aluminium-zinc alloy which is cheaper and lighter than steel. This use of alloy and a blunt edge also avoids the Japanese legal restrictions on the manufacture of swords made of ferrous metals. As such, Japanese-made iaitō are intended as practice weapons and are not suited for any type of contact. The best alloy blades are rather faithful reproductions of real swords with authentic weight and shape along with similarly high-quality finish and fittings. Iaitō may even have a mock hamon (刃文, lit., blade pattern, the temper line of a tempered steel blade). The average weight for a real uchigatana (打刀) is typically 1,200 g without the scabbard while a typical alloy iaitō is roughly 820 g. Some steel iaitō are also constructed and can weigh around 900–950 g for a 74 cm blade. \nSome imitation Japanese swords are made in countries other than Japan. They may even be made of folded steel, much like a real katana, but with a blunt edge. Such weapons would face the same use and ownership restrictions in Japan as genuine swords, and would not be called iaitō in Japan. \nFirst iaitō were made after the Second World War, to permit people without means to own a real sword, to have a tool for their practice of modern budo. Iaito are produced by specialized workshops not in direct relations with shinken sword smiths.\nSome dōjō in Japan recommend that only alloy blades be used for practicing iaidō until the practitioner’s skill is consistent enough to safely use a sharp-edged sword, Some iaidō schools may require a practitioner to start with a shinken right away, while other schools prohibit the use of a shinken altogether.\nThe matching of iaitō length, weight, and balance to the practitioner’s build and strength is of utmost importance to safely and correctly perform the iaidō forms (kata). Due to the repetition involved in the practicing of iaidō, iaitō are often constructed with the balance point of the blade being set farther from the blade’s point (kissaki) and closer to the guard (tsuba) than other blades.\nTaekwondo (/ˌtaɪkwɒnˈdoʊ/, UK also /ˌtaɪˈkwɒndoʊ/; from Korean 태권도/跆拳道 [tʰɛ.k͈wʌn.do] ( listen)) is a Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques. \nTaekwondo was developed during the 1940s and 1950s by Korean martial artists with experience in martial arts such as taekkwon karate, Chinese martial arts, and indigenous Korean martial arts traditions such as Taekkyeon, Subak, and Gwonbeop. The oldest governing body for taekwondo is the Korea Taekwondo Association (KTA), formed in 1959 through a collaborative effort by representatives from the nine original kwans, or martial arts schools, in Korea. The main international organisational bodies for taekwondo today are the International Taekwon-Do Federation (ITF), founded by Choi Hong Hi in 1966, and the partnership of the Kukkiwon and World Taekwondo (WT, formerly WTF), founded in 1972 and 1973 respectively by the Korea Taekwondo Association. Gyeorugi ([kjʌɾuɡi]), a type of full-contact sparring, has been an Olympic event since 2000. The governing body for taekwondo in the Olympics and Paralympics is World Taekwondo. \nThe wakizashi (Japanese: 脇差, "side inserted [sword]") is one of the traditionally made Japanese swords (nihontō) worn by the samurai in feudal Japan. \nThe wakizashi has a blade between 30 and 60 cm (12 and 24 in), with wakizashi close to the length of a katana being called ō-wakizashi and wakizashi closer to tantō length being called kō-wakizashi. The wakizashi being worn together with the katana was the official sign that the wearer was a samurai or swordsman. When worn together the pair of swords were called daishō, which translates literally as "big-little". The katana was the big or long sword and the wakizashi the "little" or companion sword. Wakizashi are not necessarily just a smaller version of the katana; they could be forged differently and have a different cross section.\n\n\nKendo (剣道 kendō, lit. "sword way") is a traditional Japanese martial art, which descended from swordsmanship (kenjutsu) and uses bamboo swords (shinai) and protective armour (bōgu). Today, it is widely practiced within Japan and many other nations across the world. \nKendo is an activity that combines martial arts practices and values with strenuous sport-like physical activity. \n\nNinjutsu (忍術), sometimes used interchangeably with the modern term ninpō (忍法), is the strategy and tactics of unconventional warfare, guerrilla warfare and espionage purportedly practiced by the shinobi (commonly known outside Japan as ninja). Ninjutsu was a separate discipline in some traditional Japanese schools, which integrated study of more conventional martial arts (taijutsu) along with shurikenjutsu, kenjutsu, sōjutsu, bōjutsu and others.\nWhile there is an international martial arts organization representing several modern styles of ninjutsu, the historical lineage of these styles is disputed. Some schools claim to be the only legitimate heir of the art, but ninjutsu is not centralized like modernized martial arts such as judo or karate. Togakure-ryū claims to be the oldest recorded form of ninjutsu, and claims to have survived past the 16th century.\n\nHattori Hanzō (服部 半蔵, ~1542 – November 4, 1596), also known as Hattori Masanari or Hattori Masashige (服部 正成), was a famous samurai of the Sengoku era, credited with saving the life of Tokugawa Ieyasu and then helping him to become the ruler of united Japan. Today, he is often a subject of varied portrayal in modern popular culture. \n\nThe naginata (なぎなた, 薙刀) is one of several varieties of traditionally made Japanese blades (nihonto) in the form of a pole weapon. Naginata were originally used by the samurai class of feudal Japan, as well as by ashigaru (foot soldiers) and sōhei (warrior monks). The naginata is the iconic weapon of the onna-bugeisha-archetype, a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese nobility. \nNaginata for fighting men and warrior monks were ō-naginata. The kind used by women was called ko-naginata. Since the naginata with its pole is heavier and much slower than the Japanese sword, the blade of the ko-naginata was smaller than the male warrior's ō-naginata in order to compensate for the lesser height and upper-body strength of a woman than an armoured male samurai.